Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Monday, November 30
 

3:00pm

NAEPSDP Board Meeting
Monday November 30, 2015 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Meringue

6:00pm

Welcome Reception & Newcomer's Orientation
Monday November 30, 2015 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Ovation
 
Tuesday, December 1
 

8:30am

Welcome & Overview
Tuesday December 1, 2015 8:30am - 8:45am
Ovation

8:45am

Attendee Introductions
Tuesday December 1, 2015 8:45am - 9:00am
Ovation

9:00am

10:00am

Keynote Session
Speakers
avatar for Debra Davis

Debra Davis

Professor Emeritus, LSU AgCenter


Tuesday December 1, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
Ovation

11:00am

Break
Tuesday December 1, 2015 11:00am - 11:15am
Atrium

11:15am

Using Facebook to Reach New Audiences
Introduction
Throughout the world, people are increasingly using social media to learn about new ideas, connect with others, and get informed about current events. Facebook is the largest social media platform available (King, 2015). Opportunities exist for Cooperative Extension to use this platform for a variety of purposes. Program Development centers can extend their reach by offering resources to Extension professionals on a popular social media platform. The following research was conducted to explore audience interaction with a social media page for the UF/IFAS Program Development and Evaluation Center (PDEC). 

Purpose
This research explored the various interactions of individuals with a program development-themed social media page. This research addressed the following questions: 
1. What are the effects of organic audience growth? 
2. What content attracts the most interaction? 

Methods
The information used in this research was obtained through the UF/IFAS Program Development and Evaluation Center Facebook page. Facebook’s online page feature, Insights, was used in order to better assess audience scope and content successes. This feature allows page administrators to view audience reach and content engagement through likes and reach. The total posts analyzed for this study was N = 113, all posted between February 2015-July 2015, although the number of followers continues to increase each week. 

Posts were analyzed for total reach and engagement. Posts with over 70 post reaches as well as engagement of over 5 people were analyzed. Post content was categorized into broad themes. Audience reach was analyzed for Page likes. 

Results
Objective 1
Upon analyzing the audience reach, 16 different states were identified within the audience. The states included: Florida, Montana, Connecticut, Missouri, Texas, Georgia, Maryland, Indiana, Tennessee, California, Arkansas, New Jersey, Minnesota, Virginia, Ohio, and Oklahoma. Further analysis of the audience reach revealed a total of five countries represented: United States, Brazil, Trinidad & Tobago, Suriname, and Costa Rica. 

Objective 2
Posts with the highest engagement featured state Extension faculty sharing successful county programs. These posts were viewed and shared more than other posts. They featured a paragraph review of the programs as well as high quality images reflecting the programs. 

Posts featuring links to articles highlighting ways to balance work and life had high rates of engagement. Articles in these posts were focused on tips to manage workload as well as creating boundaries between work and home. 
The third most popular type of posts featured practical ways to overcome barriers when using social media in Extension. They covered various ways to use social media to market programs to diverse audiences, including creating visual images communicating information about programs. 

Recommendations and Implications
There are vast opportunities to use Facebook as a way to provide resources to Extension professionals. Program development content is of interest to audiences beyond one state or country. Posts featuring images and content relating to Extension faculty increases engagement on Facebook pages. The most popular content applies to current and common issues. 

References
King, H. (2015, July 29). Facebook is now the world’s most-used tech product. CNN Money. Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com/2015/07/29/technology/facebook-earnings/index.html?sr=fbmoney072915facebook745story

Speakers
avatar for Amy Harder

Amy Harder

University of Florida
avatar for Priscilla Zelaya

Priscilla Zelaya

University of Florida


Tuesday December 1, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am
Tango B

11:15am

Millenials - Hired Today, Gone Tomorrow (Implications for HR and Staff Development)
There have been volumes written on the coming of Millenials to the workforce, and the changes they will bring and demand.  But what is true?  According to a recent study 25% of Millenials believe working for a company for seven months makes them a loyal employee.  More than 61% of Millennials think they should be promoted every two to three years, and 91% expect to stay in a positon for fewer than 3 years.  Not exactly the picture of the past or current Extension workforce.  So, what can we do to engage and retain Millenials?  This hour-long workshop will dispel myths and provide time for creative collaboration on the challenge of Millenials in Extension.  Come prepared to be surprised at some of the ‘facts,’ pleased about at least some of the implications, and involved in the discussion!

Speakers
avatar for Judith Barth

Judith Barth

NAEPSDP President, Colorado State University
Human Resources, Legal issues, Federal reporting, Colorado Planning and Reporting, Division of Continuing Education(DCE) contact


Tuesday December 1, 2015 11:15am - 12:15pm
Tango A

11:15am

Trends, Issues, & Innovation: New Paths for Extension
Society is going through rapid waves of change, and Cooperative Extension risks falling behind current and emerging tools and resources. This puts Extension in the position of moving from an early adopter and teacher of technology to catching up with the technology our clientele uses. 

Our session focuses on identifying current and future trends that can impact Extension (examples include The Internet of Things, citizen science, the Maker movement [including 3D printing], automation and robotics, and changing clientele demographics), then will focus on innovation as a method to create new ideas, resources, programming, and even personnel practices. We discuss why addressing disruptive innovation is important  and examine methods and resources for encouraging and growing innovation. Participants will be engaged throughout the session and will add to and edit an online resource document during and after the session. An additional digital handout will supplement the session (containing information presented, links to resources, and more)

Our goals are to increase awareness of pressing trends and issues, share tools, resources, and methods that peers can use at their institution, and co-learn additional resources from participants.

Speakers

Tuesday December 1, 2015 11:15am - 12:15pm
Meringue

11:15am

Growth Mindset vs. Fixed Mindset: Strategies for Enriching the Learning Experiences of Adult Learners
Beliefs concerning the nature and acquisition of knowledge and one's ability can impact the learning process. While many adults may be motivated to learn, not all adult learners are prepared to engage and learn with a growth mindset. This session covers strategies for cultivating a growth mindset in adult learners. The target audience for this session includes individuals who instruct, advise, or mentor adult learners in academic, workplace, or community environments.

Beliefs regarding the nature and acquisition of knowledge impact learning (Chen & Pajares, 2009; Hofer 2001). Four dimensions, certainty, source, justification, and simplicity of knowledge, assessed on a continuum from naive to sophisticated, comprise the epistemic belief construct. Schommer (1990) added two additional dimensions, fixed ability and quick learning. Stated from the naive perspective, one has a limited amount of ability and if one does not learn quickly no amount of additional review will help to learn the concept. Naive epistemic beliefs imply the learner has little agency, which aligns with Dweck's (2006) concept of fixed mindset. Dweck posits that learners can have fixed or growth mindsets.

Fixed mindset learners don't realize that ability can be developed with increased effort and persistence, but growth mindset learners know that persistence and challenges are part of learning that lead to increased ability. For many adult learners, the fixed mindset has been reinforced over the years by standardized testing, fear of failure, rewards based on outcomes, and a constant comparison to others. Designing and applying strategies that cultivate growth mindsets and more sophisticated epistemic beliefs can enhance the learning experience for adult learners as well as supporting their cognitive, social, and emotional development.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Heaverlo

Carol Heaverlo

ISU Extension & Outreach


Tuesday December 1, 2015 11:15am - 12:15pm
Samba

11:45am

Narrate Your Work
There are many social media tools available today that can have powerful results in your professional endeavors. Come learn how to build your personal learning network and effectively use that network to reduce your workload, create better programs and become recognized as an expert in your field. This session will discuss criteria for selecting the tools to help you get started, and best-practices for getting started.

3 takeaway messages that participants will receive
— To become known as an expert in a field, you have to share what you know. 
— Working in the open can help you build your personal learning network. 
— Narrating your work can be an effective training and mentoring tool. 

Improved communications is essential to eliminate duplicate work and collaborating. Collaborating is essential to creating excellent programs. “Narrating your work” is an effective way to improve communications and share what you are doing and learn what others are doing.

If you start each project from ground zero, you will never build an awesome program. But, if you can build on what others have done, then the same time investment can take you much farther.  The only way you can build on what others have done is to know what they are doing. 

Build your Personal Learning Network and connect with the experts in your field. Chances are they are not the people in your normal chain of command. You will probably find them across the country or world or it may be a coworker a few counties away.

Why not set the example and start sharing what you are working on and what you are learning? Become the mentor to your colleagues that are just starting. Become famous for what you know - at least within your circles.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hill

Paul Hill

Extension Professor, Utah State University
Paul Hill is an Extension Professor for Utah State University. He directs the 4-H STEM and economic development programs in Washington County. He is a current eXtension Fellow--building the Maker Community--and a digital media leader for eXtension’s national Educational Technology Learning Network (EdTechLN). He was the 2015 recipient of the Utah Governor’s Medal for Science Technology and Faculty Innovator Award from USU Extension. He... Read More →


Tuesday December 1, 2015 11:45am - 12:15pm
Tango B

12:15pm

Lunch Break
Tuesday December 1, 2015 12:15pm - 2:00pm
San Diego

2:00pm

Reporting & Evaluation using Qualtrics & Tableau
Each year the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) collects data on clientele contacts, volunteers, programming effort, and outcomes (i.e., change in knowledge, behavior, condition) from hundreds of faculty statewide to fulfill our federal and state accountability reporting needs. Just like every other state.

In addition to this work, Extension evaluators have been collecting public opinion data on specific issues facing the state to a) identify knowledge gaps, b) determine where extension efforts should be placed and c) determine how audience segmentation can be applied to reach specific groups needing extension programming.

Data visualization, or viz, is the process of communicating results using charts, tables, flow diagrams, maps, dashboards, etc.  When data is displayed in this way, users can more easily see patterns, identify trends and outliers, and discover new insights. A good data viz will engage the user and be thought provoking.  

Speakers
avatar for Diane Craig

Diane Craig

Research/Data Analyst, University of Florida


Tuesday December 1, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Tango A

2:00pm

Coaching for Performance
Help Your Employees Improve Their Performance: Through this interactive seminar, the department head and/or supervisor will have a better understanding of the key skill that is needed to motivate their employees and teams to excel; the skill of coaching. Coaching delivers results because of the supportive relationship between the coach and the employee.  In the seminar, the presenters will provide participants with coaching tools and steps of effective coaching for performance, building a coaching atmosphere, and understanding the importance of effective communication process.  Material handouts and resources will be provided to each seminar participant.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Marie Manton

Linda Marie Manton

Executive Director HR--Staff, University of California
Her areas of specialty are: Community leadership development, Myers-Briggs Qualified, Essential FacilitationTrainer Certified, Crucial Conversation Trainer Certified, MS in Extension Education, Retiring on January 1, 2016 after 43 years with Cooperative Extension.


Tuesday December 1, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Meringue

2:00pm

From Content to Community: Programming Shifts and Strategies Across the MFLN
The Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) uses online formal and informal programming to connect military family service professionals (MFSPs) to each other and to research and disciplinary experts in Extension and at the Department of Defense (DoD). MFLN is in its fifth year of funding, and has grown to include seven concentrations area teams spanning nine disciplines across eleven land grant universities and the Department of Defense. MFLN's success over the past several years can in part be contributed to the network's ability to embrace complexity amid dynamic expectations and environments: social, political, and economic factors cogent to DoD; advancements in technology and educational delivery opportunities; and the evolution of eXtension. Tracking and demonstrating growth and success over these past several years has also required fluidity and a willingness to embrace complexity, learn from our challenges as well as our successes, and constantly revisit the practical connections between our day-to-day work trajectories and our programming vision.

In this presentation we will discuss a recent and ongoing shift across the MFLN: moving from programming strategy based in content and resource sharing to one grounded in experience and community. We know that engaged adult learners have unique needs in the context of both informal and formal education: they are problem-centered (experiential) rather than content-oriented; they are self-directed; and they are most interested in learning activities that have immediate relevance to their work (Knowles, 1984). MFLN leadership has recently been revisiting our programming efforts in the context of these key tenets of andragogy. MFLN programming has long aspired to advance these tenets; however, current reflection and evaluation cycles have shown that we still have work to do. During this presentation we will share our approaches for innovating our ongoing programming in several areas: shifting programming from content delivery to experiential sharing; using social media to support and enhance programming rather than emphasize marketing and communications; and developing evaluation plans that emphasize program innovation and impact.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Jeannette

Karen Jeannette

Military Families Learning Network
avatar for Brigitte Scott

Brigitte Scott

Military Families Learning Network, Virginia Tech
Virginia Tech


Tuesday December 1, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Samba

2:00pm

Using Interactive Technology for Online Courses
Studies show that in order for the brain to retain information, it is necessary to use the information immediately following the learning experience, regardless of the training platform.  Using software to create an interactive experience in an online class generates a richer experience and higher retention for students of all ages. In order to meet this need, there are a number of software’s available to help an instructor create an interactive class. 
I will show examples of a number of the software programs available, including Captivate, SnagIt, and Sparkol VIdeoScribe. I will discuss pros and cons of the software, including the cost, ease of learning and additional issues to consider when choosing a program(s).

Speakers
avatar for Faye Cragin

Faye Cragin

UNH Cooperative Extension


Tuesday December 1, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Tango B

3:00pm

Break
Tuesday December 1, 2015 3:00pm - 3:15pm
Atrium

3:15pm

ISUEO Professional Development Needs Assessment Survey Instrument: Defining Our Future with Data
Iowa State University Extension and Outreach has created a professional development needs assessment instrument that will gauge the overall professional development needs of Extension and Outreach employees, regardless of their respective roles within the Organization.  An extensive review of the literature and other land-grant university extension websites indicated a paucity of professional development assessments tools that would benefit the wide variety of Extension and Outreach's employees when identifying professional development needs.  A survey assessment tool, created specifically for Iowa State University Extension and Outreach employees, was designed as a result of this research.  The research team utilized Iowa State University Extension and Outreach's Core Competencies and Program Development Process as a framework for the instrument's design.   Selected questions within the survey instrument were adapted from a variety of other land-grant university survey instruments which were developed originally for specific target audiences, e.g., 4-H Agents. 

Through extensive review of survey assessments and reports that focused on the professional development needs of various departments throughout Extension and Outreach, selected questions were adapted for inclusion in the instrument.  The remaining instrument questions were developed by the researchers, based on a review of the literature and study of psychometrics.  Instruments and current research that served as a resource for the development of the instrument include assessments such as:

· Professional Development Needs of State Extension Specialists 
· On-Line Professional Development for Extension Educators
· Examining a Professional Development System: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment Approach
· Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Staff Core Competencies
· Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Program Development Process
· University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Professionals Learning Needs Survey 

The survey instrument consists of 80 questions, purposefully worded to gather the most insightful data on individual professional development needs and preferred method(s) of delivery.  Quantitative and open-ended questions were designed using a Likert-type scale.  A side-by-side format was chosen to collect quantitative data, while an open-ended format was selected to gather qualitative data.  Drawing upon ISUEO's Staff Core Competencies and Program Development Process, the professional development needs assessment survey includes two main sections, Personal Development and Program Development Process, which were then broken down further into categories.  Categories under Personal Development include: leadership, supervision and communications.  Needs assessment, program design and development, program implementation and delivery, and evaluation compose the categories related to the Program Development Process. 

The survey will be administered for the first time in October 2015.  Initial results will be gathered and interpreted through November 2015.  The research team plans to present the preliminary findings of the survey at the 2015 NAEPSDP Conference in San Diego in December 2015.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Bakley

Amanda Bakley

Iowa State University


Tuesday December 1, 2015 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Tango A

3:15pm

Using Digital Measures for Program Planning & Reporting
University of Maryland Extension (UME) has been using Digital Measures' Activity Insight software platform for program reporting. Other universities and Extension organizations have also moved to this platform. It was the goal of UME when the system was bought to use Activity Insight as a comprehensive program planning and reporting system. The first phase of this transition was undertaken in 2014 when the UME reporting system (UMERS) was developed and put into use. In 2015, UME started the second phase of the project by building the program planning process to this platform. In addition, while this change was taking place with the software system, UME also adopted a new parity formula for program participation. This session will provide an update of UMERs, the new program planning system, and the revised parity formula used by UME.

Speakers
avatar for Teresa McCoy

Teresa McCoy

Assistant Director, University of Maryland Extension
Teresa was hired as the Assistant Director, MCE, Evaluation & Assessment, in August 2008. She comes to University of Maryland Extension with a long-term commitment to higher education outreach and Extension. She earned her B.A. and MPA (Master’s in Public Administration) from Virginia Tech. She started her Ph.D. coursework at Cleveland State University and is committed to finishing her Ph.D. in Higher Education administration at... Read More →


Tuesday December 1, 2015 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Tango B

3:15pm

More than Sweet Talk: The Use of Appreciative Inquiry for Organizational Development
Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is a facilitated inquiry-based model for organizational planning that asks, “What is working well and how do we build on it?” This flexible and constructive approach can be used as a tool for strategic planning, decision-making, employee/executive coaching, evaluation, organization redesign and restructuring. The use of AI participatory action planning can change the focus of divisive groups from problem-focused to collaborative innovation. AI utilizes the articulation of collective value to identify small steps and reward innovative thinking and action for longer-term planning and development.

Developed by David Cooperrider at Case Western University and developed from work at the Cleveland Clinic, AI has been used by both the non-profit sector and private industry including John Deere, World Bank, the UN, McDonalds, Verison, NASA and the American Red Cross. During this session, participants will gain knowledge and receive sample tools and resources to support utilization of the AI 4-D process.

Appreciative Inquiry has demonstrated excellent results with the development of openness and teamwork between people and groups who have significant trust issues.  It has been said that, "Appreciative Inquiry is a lot like duct tape. The possible applications are endless and the results are almost always unexpected and often spectacular" (unknown).

Speakers
avatar for Karen Ballard

Karen Ballard

Professor - Program Evaluation, University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service
Evaluation Consultation & Training | Soybean Science Challenge PI  |


Tuesday December 1, 2015 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Meringue

3:15pm

When Moving Workshops Online, You Must Learn to Chunk It
Taking face-to-face trainings to an online format can be time consuming, difficult, and stressful but the rewards can be great.  Keeping participants in the room for an hour long presentation is possible when you can maintain eye-contact.  However, when you go online you must break it down into 2-7 minute Chunks or you will lose your audience.  

In this session you will learn how program and staff development specialists worked with the Office of Communication and Creative services director and staff to chunk or chuck classes for Extension Agents.  Once the learning objectives were identified for the classes we had to decide what to keep and what had to go.  We will share the design tools, the good, bad, and the ugly of the process.  We will finish the session with ways we measured impact, the benefits of teaching online, and the projected cost-savings.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Hurt

Todd Hurt

University of Georgia
University of Georgia
avatar for Angela Rowell

Angela Rowell

Director, Office of Communications and Creative Services, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
avatar for Marcie Simpson

Marcie Simpson

Program and Staff Development Specialist, UGA


Tuesday December 1, 2015 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Samba

4:15pm

Using the Borich Needs Assessment Model to Identify In-Service Training Needs
This presentation will cover the Borich Needs Assessment Model as a tool for identify the training needs of extension educators, highlight results from a recent study focused on competencies related to evaluating extension activities, and demonstrate how this type of analysis can be incorporated into SPSS. 

The Borich Model has been used for decades to identify in-service training needs. This presentation will provide an overview of the model including conceptual underpinnings, typical instrument used, types of discrepancies measured, mean weighted discrepancy scores, and how the scores are used to identify the competencies most in need of being addressed via in-service training.

An example from a study, to be conducted in the near future, will highlight how the model works in practice. The study will focus on competencies related to evaluating extension activities and programs.

In addition, there will be a demonstration of how Borich weighted mean discrepancy scores can be automatically generated, and seamlessly by incorporated into SPSS menus, using syntax commands,  macro language, and the custom dialogue tool.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Pope

Paul Pope

Extension Program Specialist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
Interested in evaluation, surveys, and statistical software programming.


Tuesday December 1, 2015 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Tango A

4:15pm

F4S and Humble Inquiry: Two Approaches in Orienting New Educators/Agents
Extension educators/agents have a complex role, in complex times. They simultaneously balance multiple “tensions” in work. They need to generate, offer and stay current on evidence-based research and knowledge, when stakeholders can quickly access other resources via technology at a faster pace than ever. They need to work independently and interdependently, in a geographically-dispersed organization. They simultaneously represent the unit, organization, university, land-grant mission and public sector. Their work is amidst the demographic changes, environmental issues and economic concerns affecting community life and generating complex problems where neither the problems, nor solutions, are clear. Yet, educators/agents feel pressure to be the ‘expert’ with solutions. Challenging times can create unease, stress, discomfort and fear, characteristics that inhibit learning and openness to the change that learning will prompt. Extension education demands that educators/agents engage and build effective relationships with those of all ages and backgrounds regardless of issue or setting.

To help new educators/agents be successful across these many complex situations, their orientation needs to include multiple strategies, ongoing opportunities, and incorporate both teaching and modeling of a helpful approach called “Humble Inquiry”. Multiple strategies can address the varied learning styles of these adult learners, and introduce a breadth of resources they can tap for future use. Ongoing orientation strategies beyond the first 6 months, for example, allow new educators/agents to have a better understanding of the role and its complexities and ‘make meaning’ of what they’ve learned. These strategies help build staff knowledge, skills and resources.

Modeling and teaching the “Humble Inquiry” approach helps new staff remember that how they engage with others in these complex times is as important as what they know. There are situations where it is not possible for the educator/agent to know the information needed or to be someone that will automatically be trusted. It is imperative that the employee can ask questions to “build relationships that are based on mutual respect and the recognition that others know things that we [they] may need to know in order to get a job done” (Schein, 2013, p 2). Behaviors transcend language, culture, content, situations and time. Modeling---and reinforcing --behaviors that help new educators/agents createenvironments built on authentic and respectful communication will only help them succeed in their role, across any situation.

This session will briefly highlight two orientation strategies used at the University of Minnesota Extension to help set up new Educators for success. Foundations for Success (F4S) is a six-month cohort program for newer educators from across the organization who have been on the job for six months to 3 years. It includes educational sessions and small group project work and support. The second strategy to be highlighted is one the presenter has used as a supervisor: modeling and practicing the use of a “Humble Inquiry” approach, as coined in the recent book written by Edgar H. Schein (2013), in her 1-1 interactions with staff.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Ann Hennen

Mary Ann Hennen

Director, Professional Development, University of Minnesota Extension


Tuesday December 1, 2015 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Meringue

4:15pm

What are We Blending?
What are we blending? A Smoothie or Margarita?  Even those sound good-we are looking at a new “buzzword” in teaching and learning-Blended Learning.  What is that?  Blended learning is the integration of instructor-led approaches and e-learning opportunities into a seamless program.  Because developing effective e-learning programs can be difficult and complex, and it is always practical for face-to-face training, sometimes a modified blended approach is appropriate for Extension audiences.  A traditional blended learning approach uses online learning with traditional classroom instruction together for one course.  A modified version that works great in Extension programming is to have a program presented via a webinar platform with a face-to-face facilitator at the individual locations.

Some of the benefits for Extension and universities a blended learning approach can be part of a strategy to compensate for limited classroom space, as well as a way to think differently about encouraging faculty collaboration.  In Extension, it allows faculty from across a state or even a region to work together to present a topic from multiple locations.  

Several years ago, county educators with the University of Idaho Extension put together a program to work with youth and families on college scholarships on where to find scholarships and how to properly apply for these scholarships.  The first 2 years of this program, it was held as a face-to-face meeting in 1 location with about 10-20 participants.  Word got out about how great the program was, more counties wanted to participate.  To accommodate this, the planning team got together and came up with the plan to take a blended learning approach. There would be 5 sites throughout the state and each Extension Educator would teach online (using Adobe Connect and/or Zoom as the platform) to everyone but there was an on-site facilitator who would lead small group discussions.  This proved to be successful.  The first year of the blended learning approach, the number of participants increased to over 100.  Year after year, the number of sites increases. 

For programs like this, a blended learning approach using a webinar/online learning and face-to-face facilitator, allows Extension to expand their programming efforts to more stakeholders.  This workshop will give you a history of blended learning, successful models of blended learning that can be used to incorporate this method into your programming, and tips on how to select the right media for this learning method.

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Stark

Carrie Stark

State 4-H Program Director, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension


Tuesday December 1, 2015 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Samba

4:15pm

Step 1: Burn it to the Ground - An Accountability System Story
Three years ago, Texas A&M Agrilife Extension stood at a crossroads between upgrading (again) and starting over from scratch with its Accountability System and we chose the latter.  This presentation provides an informative and, hopefully, entertaining look at the process we have gone through in creating our new system (TexasData) from concept to deployment, some of the features we have added, the challenges we have faced, and the lessons we have learned along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Payne

Tom Payne

Management Analyst, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service


Tuesday December 1, 2015 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Tango B

5:00pm

 
Wednesday, December 2
 

8:30am

Recharge & Refresh
Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:30am - 9:00am
Ovation

9:00am

The New Peer Review: Digital Scholarship in a World of Traditional Pubs
Scholarly work has increasingly gained importance in Extension programming. It has become the driving force for many Extension professionals when they set programming priorities. However, the inclusion of technology has left Cooperative Extension in a conundrum. How should we now define “scholarship” when technology is involved? How can we adapt current peer review, evaluation, and reporting processes to reflect and encourage innovative outreach and engagement programming by Extension professionals?

Session participants will hear examples of digital scholarship and how Extension organizations are testing adapted evaluation and reporting procedures to accommodate technology use. Come to the session prepared to share how your organization is addressing digital scholarship, as well as discuss nationwide opportunities for improvement and collaboration.

Session Objectives:

1. To define and explain digital scholarship vs traditional scholarship.
2. To give examples of adapted peer review, evaluation, and reporting processes currently in use.
3. To begin a discussion on the value placed on traditional publications vs. digitally created content.
4. To create partnerships and collaboration between Extension organizations that will provide the opportunity to determine recommendations for evaluation, reporting, and peer review of digitally created content.

This session will be led by guiding members of the eXtension Educational Technology Learning Network. A series on digital scholarship authored by Dr. Eric Stafne from Mississippi State is posted to the EdTechLN blog: extedtechs.org/digitalscholarship

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Seger

Jamie Seger

Program Director, Educational Technology, Ohio State University Extension
Ohio State University Extension


Wednesday December 2, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Tango A

9:00am

Building Networks for Organizational Learning
In this session, leaders from the eXtension Network Literacy Community of Practice will help you understand networks; explain how network ties impact learning, collaboration and innovation; and share some strategies for building networks for learning in your organization. It is critical that those of us working in staff development in Extension understand the connections within our states and across our national organizations.

Like other organizations, Cooperative Extension is being profoundly affected by the network era. Providing access to research-based information from land-grant universities was once Extension's exclusive domain. Now, for many people, search engines have replaced calling the county Extension office or picking up the latest factsheet. As automation and algorithms perform more and more of the most straightforward tasks previously done by Extension staff, an increasing amount of Extension's value will be derived from the more complex work we perform.

As the most valuable Extension work becomes increasing complex, we need to adapt our approach to organizational learning. Complex work requires emergent practices, good or best practices. According to Harold Jarche, emergent practices are dependent on the cooperation of all workers and the free flow of knowledge. Knowledge sharing and innovation are dependent on the relationships and ties within an organization.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Bertsch

Bob Bertsch

I am seeking and sharing insights on weaving collaborative networks. | | After more than 20 years in communications, education and web technology, I have found a passion for building human networks, especially those focused on collective action. | | I'm currently a web technology specialist with North Dakota State University Agriculture Communication and engagement coordinator for the eXtension Network Literacy community of practice... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Meringue

9:00am

From Start to Finish: How to Plan and Conduct a World-Class Webinar
In the constantly changing area of digital communication, we need to utilize the technology and resources available in order to reach internal and external audiences.  In the current climate of Extension financial reality (i.e., reduced travel budgets, time, personnel and a growing clientele), it is increasingly important for Extension educators to utilize tools that extend the reach of Extension in the most efficient way possible.  One of the growing resources of communication for the University of Arkansas (U of A) Cooperative Extension Service is the use of webinars as an effective teaching tool. A webinar is defined as a seminar or presentation that takes place live over the internet, allowing participants in different locations to see and hear the presenter(s) and interact with the presenter(s) to ask questions or provide feedback.  The U of A Cooperative Extension Service has used different web-based video conferencing programs over the years to integrate the use of webinars into the organization as a tool for both educational and organizational meeting efforts.  In the last year, U of A Extension has produced and hosted 37 webinars.  As the use of the webinar format has increased, we have been learning, through reviews of the existing literature and research and from practical trial and error experience, and refining best practices for planning, delivering, and evaluating webinars. 

In this session we will cover:

- When is a webinar an appropriate educational tool
- Hardware and software options for conducting a webinar
- How to plan a webinar or webinar series
- Team coordination and assigned duties
- Talent recruitment and content preparation
- Marketing your webinar
- Practicing with your team and talent
- Delivery of the webinar
- Engagement of webinar participants before, during, and after the webinar
- Evaluating webinars
- Follow-up with participants

Participants will learn:

- The components that are necessary to plan and conduct an effective webinar
- The importance of recruiting and establishing a team to deliver the webinar and creating a work plan for the team
- When to recruit presenters and how to help them plan their content
- The importance of marketing a webinar and leveraging resources to extend the reach of a marketing plan
- The importance of practice and rehearsal for team members and presenters
- Best practices for engaging participants
- Best practices for evaluating webinars and facilitating follow-up communication with participants.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Robinson

Julie Robinson

Assistant Professor - Instructional Design, University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service
Faculty consultation and training, online curriculum development, and educational product planning and evaluation


Wednesday December 2, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Samba

9:00am

Software Showcase: Bring Your Institution's App or Website to Demo
Many Extension institutions have developed their own software for in-house use in situations where software off the shelf just won't do. The developer team of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service invites you to bring your own application and take a few minutes to show it off - whether you are a developer, administrator, or an end user. Demonstrate and learn best practices, and share challenges and frustrations.

Beyond applications, we will also take a look at websites to showcase innovative ideas or receive constructive feedback for improvement. This session will also feature a discussion on the latest trends and issues in developing applications and websites for Extension. 

Speakers
avatar for Tom Payne

Tom Payne

Management Analyst, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service


Wednesday December 2, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Tango B

10:00am

Creating and Maintaining Civility in the Workplace
During this interactive session, participants will learn what constitutes incivility and determine ways to create and maintain civility in the workplace.  Tips and resources will be provided as to how to institutionalize efforts to change the culture in an organization to one that values civility and inclusivity.  The session will focus on the case study of the University of Missouri as we worked toward creating a culture of civility.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Middleton

Julie Middleton

Director of Organizational Development, University of Missouri
Dr. Julie Middleton has three degrees from the University of Missouri, including a Doctorate in Educational Administration.  She has worked in a variety of educational settings from elementary to higher education, serving in the public schools as a Teacher, an Administrator, and as a Coordinator of Multicultural Education.  At the University level, Julie has been a Project Consultant in the Office of the Vice Provost, and Assistant to... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
Samba

10:00am

Interacting With Your Gay & Lesbian Colleagues
Our society is increasingly more open on social issues; this includes more pubic openness by gay and lesbian members of society. In Extension we have gay and lesbian colleagues, volunteers, community partners with whom we interface regularly.  Based on our experiences and exposure we each have different levels of comfort and skills in these interactions.

My experience in Extension has shown that while making advances we have significant work, individually and collectively, to gain a higher level of acceptance for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered individuals. I hear many stories of Extension colleagues who fear being 'out'. Acceptance is critical to a healthy work environment for all colleagues, as well as to an organization aiming to be accessible to those who define themselves as coming from those communities.

This session has been presented to University classes, Community Leadership Series and Extension professionals. It offers a personal voice with concrete examples that relate to the workplace.  It will offer a dialog for appropriate language and subtle ways to support an accepting work environment.  Participants will be encouraged to come with their own specific questions for an open conversation.  Participants will also be challenged to vision what work does Extension need to do in order to be more welcoming to clients who are LGBT? This session is pertinent to the full breadth of Extension professionals from field staff to administrators and across all program areas. Our goal is to facilitate a journey of acceptance and inclusion for and by all.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Myers

Jeffrey Myers

University of Maryland Extension


Wednesday December 2, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
Tango A

10:00am

The Kirton Adaption Innovation KAI Inventory: Identifying and Enhancing Individual and Team Problem Solving
The Adaption Innovation Theory and its associated psychometric instrument, the KAI Inventory, provide insight into how people solve problems and interact while decision-making.  Using this insight can improve the dynamics and cohesion of teams; can show that individuals within a team approach problems differently and that this very difference can be used to strengthen the team; and, can lead to the differences not only being tolerated, but welcomed.  The Adaption Innovation Theory is founded on the assumption that all people solve problems and are creative. The theory sharply distinguishes between level and style of creativity, problem solving, and decision-making and is concerned only with style.  These style differences lie on a normally distributed continuum, ranging from high adaption to high innovation.  Those scoring as more adaptive approach problems within the given terms of reference, theories, policies, precedents, and paradigms and strive to provide better" solutions.  By contrast those more innovative tend to detach the problem from the way it is customarily perceived and

Wednesday December 2, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
Meringue

10:00am

Pros and Cons of Articulate Storyline
Articulate Story line touts itself as the renowned rapid e-learning software.  An it is a great product.  Come hear the pros and cons of this software from someone who has dabbled in Adobe products, open source options, and Story line.  Small group work will allow participants to see the software in action.

Speakers
avatar for Marcie Simpson

Marcie Simpson

Program and Staff Development Specialist, UGA


Wednesday December 2, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
Tango B

10:30am

Break
Wednesday December 2, 2015 10:30am - 10:45am
Atrium

10:45am

Focus and Reflection
Wednesday December 2, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Ovation

11:15am

Quick Hits
Wednesday December 2, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am
Ovation

11:45am

Lunch & NAEPSDP Business Meeting
Wednesday December 2, 2015 11:45am - 1:15pm
Ovation

1:15pm

JCEP & Awards Ceremony
Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:15pm - 1:30pm
Ovation

1:30pm

Break
Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:30pm - 1:45pm
Atrium

1:45pm

Social Media Analytics Workshop
BYOD and learn step-by-step where to find your analytical data for some of the most widely used social media sites! This hands-on workshop will focus on Facebook Insights, Google Analytics, and Twitter stats, but may cover more depending on need of participants and time available. Data aggregation tools will also be introduced. Examples of how to generally report your data will be covered as well.

Session objectives:

1. To give participants hands-on experience locating and aggregating social media engagement and reach data.

2. To introduce easy-to-use free and/or paid-for data aggregation tools.

3. To provide examples of how to generally and descriptively report social media use engagement and reach data.

4. To learn from participants their main social media reporting and evaluation frustrations or hangups.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Seger

Jamie Seger

Program Director, Educational Technology, Ohio State University Extension
Ohio State University Extension


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Tango B

1:45pm

A Gentle Introduction to Social Network Analysis
Research suggests that social support is often a strong predictor of success (Fishbein & Ajzen, 2010; Bandura, 1986). The personal interactions among families, friends, and others shape attitudes toward behaviors by communicating acceptance or rejection of the behavior. When social support is strong, a person feels pressure to adopt a behavior. Given the power of social support many Extension programs have adopted an ecological systems approach in programs like family development, nutrition, youth development, community development and leadership. The ecological systems approach emphasizes teaching family, friends, and other influential people surrounding an individual how to support positive behavior change. There may also be an emphasis on teaching individuals how to build their own social support network.

As program designers invest more resources into social support systems, a next logical step is to assess the success of the program. Potential evaluation questions may include the following:

· Who are the members of an individual's social support network?
· How strong is the members' influence on the individual?
· Has the individual's social support network evolved over the course of the program?

Social network analysis (SNA) is one tool that evaluators can use to answer these and similar questions about social support systems. At a fundamental level, SNA looks at individuals and the strength of their relationships. As more individuals are added to a support system, a web begins to emerge with thinner and thicker lines used to illustrate the strength of the relationships. SNA also allows evaluators to look at these relationships nested within groups like family and friends

The purpose of this session is to prepare participants to design, collect, and analyze social network data. As part of the session, participants will brainstorm potential evaluation questions that are appropriate for social network analysis. They will participate in a hands-on simulation illustrating different data collection methods, will be introduced to social network analysis software, and will analyze a simple data set. A computer with internet access is required for the analysis part of the workshop. If possible, participants without a computer or internet access will be paired with participants who do have access for the data analysis portion of the workshop. Resources that will be provided to participants include a reference sheet for the data collection methods demonstrated during the session; a beginner's guide to data analysis for the software used in the workshop; and a reference list of SNA resources and example SNA studies.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Cater

Melissa Cater

Assistant Professor, LSU AgCenter


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Tango A

1:45pm

Creating Inclusive Extension Programs and Professionals: Bridging Connections to LGBTQ+ Communities
Cooperative Extension programs should be inclusive for clientele of all demographics. As we know, our programs are required to meet Affirmative Action and non-discrimination requirements in our employment practices and program offerings. These requirements protect individuals regardless of their sex and sexual orientation. To meet these requirements, it is important for extension professionals to have the language and knowledge necessary to ensure that their programs are positive and supportive environments that provide physical, mental, and emotional safety for individuals who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community.

This workshop will teach participants to create inclusive programs and spaces where all individuals, including those who identify as LGBTQ+, can work together and/or learn together to address local, regional, and national needs. Session Purpose: In this session, participants will learning about creating safe, inclusive spaces for individuals, who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Session Objectives: 1. Discuss the historical roots and the positive and negative uses of language as it relates to the LGBTQ+ community. 2. Review current findings from research with individuals in the LGBT community. 3. Present the differences between sex, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation. 4. Describe unique learning and safety needs of individuals who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community. 5. Outline practical steps to create safe spaces for individuals who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community. Audience Engagement: This session will utilize some lecture as an instructional method; however, participants will also engage in reflections, scenarios, written exercises, and small group discussion. This workshop will provide concrete steps for individuals to take (and help them in taking the first steps) to creating safe spaces for individuals who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community in their own program settings. Beyond simply providing a list of steps to take in the future, participants will work together in small groups to address these steps in relationship to their own programs and clientele.

Experiential Learning Model: This workshop will utilize the following steps to create an experiential and inquiry-based learning environment for workshop participants: 1) Participants will voluntarily choose to attend this session; 2) Participants will experience a scenario-based, hands-on identity game to understand the variety of experiences individuals who identify as LGBTQ+ may face; 3) Whenever possible information will be shared using inquiry-led practices, including open-ended questions; 4) Participants will process through guided and self-directed reflection; 5) Participants will generalize through small group discussions about their own experiences; 6) Participants will prepare to apply their learning by considering how to implement steps to creating safe spaces in their own program.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Soule

Katherine Soule

University of California, Agriculture & Natural Resources Division


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Samba

1:45pm

Strategic Grantsmanship
Successful grant proposals share one common trait: a perfect fit between the proposed project and the funder's priorities.   But some perfect fit projects are consigned to the unfunded pile.  Why?  What accounts for those different funding outcomes?  The answer: the perceptions of proposal reviewers.  This workshop, Strategic Grantsmanship, will help participants understand and practice the processes that will get their - or their staff members - perfect project into that very small will fund pile.

This 90 minute workshop will especially focus on the most important proposal section for shaping reviewers' perceptions about the strengths and fit of a proposal: the Abstract or Summary. (Yes, the proposal piece most often left until the 11th hour.) Through hands-on analysis of sample efforts, participants will build skills in strategically thinking about and writing the Abstract for maximum impact on the reviewers' perceptions.  

We will also focus on how to infuse those strategies into the entire proposal so that perceptions built in the Abstract are reinforced throughout.  In looking beyond the Abstract, we will examine common, and not-so-common, grantsmanship principles and practices:
o Responding to the formal review process—what reviewers are looking for
o Organizing individual elements/sections
o Strategically linking proposal elements to maximize proposal strengths
o Responding to the informal review process—what reviewers are looking at
o Crafting a clear, comprehensive and compelling proposal

Experienced extension professionals will leave the workshop with a stronger understanding of, and practice in, the grantsmanship processes that can make an excellent project a funded project.   With that understanding, they will be able to more constructively assist staff members - even if they read no further than the abstract.  

Strategic Grantsmanship will be led by Neil Schwartzbach.  A grants consultant (www.grantontarget.com), Neil was an extension associate at Cornell University for 15 years.  At Cornell, his efforts focused on community outreach and especially grant writing, both at the Community and Rural Development Institute (12 years) and the American Indian Program (3 years).

Speakers
avatar for Neil Schwartzbach

Neil Schwartzbach

Principal, Grants On Target
Neil Schwartzbach has been a grant writer and proposal ‘fixer’ for more than twenty years. He honed his grant writing skills as an extension associate at Cornell University. There, his grantsmanship efforts were driven by key elements of the land grant mission, particularly working at the intersection of social sciences and natural sciences, community development and outreach. Addressing community needs is also at the heart of his own... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Meringue

2:30pm

How to Manage Information Flow & Curate for Thought Leadership in Social Media
In this workshop you will learn how to 1. Use Google Search and Google Alerts to program a custom flow of only the information you find relevant. 2. Discover how to curate the information you want to reference for scholarly publications and sharing over social media using Diigo—an application that allows you to save and tag your online resources for easy access (we will demonstrate how to use Diigo from your desktop and iOS mobile device).  And 3. Become a thought leader in social media spaces by figuring out which areas of expertise and social networks to focus your efforts and learning to listen using Twitter’s Advanced Search tool to attract a community of followers you can lead, influence, and educate .

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hill

Paul Hill

Extension Professor, Utah State University
Paul Hill is an Extension Professor for Utah State University. He directs the 4-H STEM and economic development programs in Washington County. He is a current eXtension Fellow--building the Maker Community--and a digital media leader for eXtension’s national Educational Technology Learning Network (EdTechLN). He was the 2015 recipient of the Utah Governor’s Medal for Science Technology and Faculty Innovator Award from USU Extension. He... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Tango B

3:30pm

 
Thursday, December 3
 

8:00am

Awards Committee
Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Tango A

8:00am

Marketing & Program Committee
Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Meringue

8:00am

Membership Committee
Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Samba

8:00am

Nominations Committee
Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Ovation

8:00am

Policy & Resolutions Committee
Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Tango B

8:00am

Special / Ad Hoc Committees
Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Ovation

9:00am

Agents Training Agents: Evaluation of the VCE District Program Leadership Team
The VCE DPLT program completed its first full year of operation at the end of 2014.  There is one DPLT in each of the four VCE Districts.  Each DPLT has six members (two ANR, two FCS, and two 4-H Agents).  There charge is to train primarily new agents (four years or less of experience) in the VCE Programming Process.  An evaluation was conducted in early 2015 to determine the helpfulness of the DPLT to agents in 2014.  An online survey was sent to all agents (approximately 220).  Agents who had interacted with the DPLT were asked to respond.  Seventy-one surveys were completed and returned.  Some key results included: 1) 51% (36) of responding agents had five or more years of experience; 49% (35) had less than four years of experience; 2) agents with four years or less of experience indicated that they interacted with their DPLT primarily through district training sessions and individual assistance; 3) when asked to rate the helpfulness of their interactions with their DPLT (where, 1=Unhelpful, 2=Somewhat unhelpful, 3=Neutral, 4=Somewhat helpful, 5=Helpful), the overall mean for these newer agents was 4.1; 4) means for categories of experience were, less than one year 4.5, one year 4.3, two years 3.8, three years 3.8, four years 3.8; and, 5) the mean for five years or more of experience was 3.6.  Given that the main focus was to help newer agents, the first year was deemed successful.  In this short session, these results, and others, of the year one evaluation will be presented with time for discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Lambur

Michael Lambur

Associate Director, Virginia Tech
I currently provide leadership for program development (situation analysis, program design, evaluation) as an Associate Director for Virginia Cooperative Extension.  I have worked as an evaluator in Cooperative Extension since 1983 with Michigan Cooperative Extension, Virginia Cooperative Extension, and the eXtension Initiative.  I have extensive experience in all aspects of evaluation of non-formal Extension programs at the local, state, and... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Tango A

9:00am

Existing Research and Future Considerations on Mentoring of Adult Learners
A comprehensive summary of the existing literature on mentoring of adult learners, within the context of the Cooperative Extension System as a learning organization, reveals that structured organizational mentoring is needed in Extension to prepare and develop individuals to be future leaders within the organization. Further inquiry is needed regarding Extension as a transformative learning organization, the role of mentees in Cooperative Extension as adult learners, training needs for veteran Extension agents to effectively serve as mentors, and orientation processes for new hires on making the most of the relationship with their mentor.

Speakers
avatar for Marina Denny

Marina Denny

Mississippi State University


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Meringue

9:00am

Illustrations, Not Just for Children's Stories
Does a 5 page detailed description of yearly programmatic efforts tell Extension's story the best possible way?  Can we do something better?  Try something different?  It takes time and dedication to sit down and read a detailed report listed everything that has been done throughout the year.  This presentation will address the use of infographics to communicate our story to stakeholders.  Telling what we do in quick, concise graphics and statements that are easy for everyone to understand.  Because sometimes pictures really do help!

Speakers
avatar for Katy Weber

Katy Weber

Extension Program Specialist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Samba

9:00am

Digital & Social Media Confab
Part panel discussion, part roundtable, and a lot of unconferencing, this session will be led by you - the participants! A group of eXtension Educational Technology Learning Network (EdTechLN) leaders and innovative Extension professionals will be on hand to answer any and all questions involving digital media and/or social media. Participants can also answer each other's questions and will drive the discussion. The first 5 minutes will be unconference" style  with participants voting on the main topics of the session. Need to know more about Pinterest? Not sure where to start with blogging? Want to ask about popular mobile apps? Just want to get new ideas and get excited about the possibilities? Don't miss this confab! We'll see you there."

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Seger

Jamie Seger

Program Director, Educational Technology, Ohio State University Extension
Ohio State University Extension


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Tango B

9:30am

Arkansas New Employee Onboarding- Mentable Session Participant Satisfaction
The University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service implemented the current new employee onboarding program in November of 2012.  The onboarding program includes a mentoring program, online courses (Extension 101, Southern Extension History, New Agent Onboarding and Mentoring, and Staff Chair Onboarding and Mentoring Training), a blended (online:face-to-face) multi-day in-service on basic-level competencies of Extension educators, and monthly Mentable sessions.   

The monthly Mentable Sessions are conducted using Zoom, an online video conferencing program.  The sessions are typically one hour in length and are conducted on the third Monday of every month.  Topics have included working with volunteers, basics of reporting, working with committees, working with key stakeholders, preparing for program reviews, and organizational updates as needed. Sessions are formatted to be peer-to-peer with veteran agents, who are invited to be guest speakers.  Extension specialists are also invited to speak on certain topics, and are usually partnered with a county agent.  District directors and other supervisors are not invited to attend or participate in sessions.  This allows new agents the opportunity to ask questions, make statements, and express themselves more freely than they might if a supervisor were present.  Topics covered in the Mentable sessions are identified by previous first year agents, current participants, and district directors. 

At the conclusion of an agent's first year, they graduate out of attending Mentable sessions.  An exit survey has been developed to evaluate participants' experiences and gain information on how the sessions can be improved.  Questions in the survey address relevance of session topics, speaker preparedness, input for future session topics and speakers, and overall value of participation in the sessions.  Upon completion of an agent's first year of employment and completion of Mentable session participation, a link to a Qualtrics survey is sent and participants are asked to complete the survey.  Questions in the survey include Likert-type scales of satisfaction, YES/ NO questions, multiple choice questions, and open-ended questions. There is no set schedule for analyzing survey results due to the fluctuation of hiring dates. 

To date, respondents to the exit survey have expressed overall satisfaction with their participation in the sessions.  Responses continue to be collected as new agents complete their first year of employment and participation in the Mentable sessions.  Results from the exit surveys are utilized to improve the overall quality of the sessions, identify future topics, verify that session logistics still accommodate the majority of session participants, and assist in identifying potential speakers. 

More in depth results of the exit survey along with best practices for planning, implementing, and evaluating monthly sessions similar to the Mentable sessions will be discussed at the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Mashburn

Diane Mashburn

Instructor - Program Planning, Evaluation and Accountability Coordinator, University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:30am - 10:00am
Meringue

9:30am

Evaluating and Rewarding Extension Agent Performance
Evaluating and recognizing the work performed by Extension Agents/Educators can be a complicated and inexact process that leaves both employees and supervisors frustrated and discouraged. However, this level of anxiety can be minimized when expectations are aligned in a succinct format that provides the means to encourage employee success.

Over the past five years, Kentucky has been deliberate in making Extension Agent evaluations more objective and meaningful. The current goal includes linking the mid-year and annual employee review process to a matrix/rubric with descriptive outcomes. The quality of work that is demonstrated at various levels of an agent’s career is also assessed, using a four point agent evaluation scale.

In addition to merit reward through the employee annual review process, Kentucky also has a career ladder in place that outlines specific expectations (of different stages) of professional development and employee performance.

This workshop will focus on a review of both the employee evaluation/review process as well as the career ladder advancement system. The presenters will provide a summary of data from the current year and solicit discussions on how other states motivate Extension professionals to achieve a higher level of quality performance.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Young

Jeff Young

District Director, University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:30am - 10:00am
Tango A

10:00am

Break
Thursday December 3, 2015 10:00am - 10:15am
Atrium

10:15am

11:00am

Capnote Session
Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
Ovation

12:00pm

NAEPSDP Board Meeting
Thursday December 3, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Meringue